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Passover

Passover

Rav Meshulam's Matzot

Published on Monday April 22th, 2019

This story concerns one of the giants of previous generations, Rabbi Meshullam Igra zatsal. (He lived about two hundred years ago and since his childhood, he was considered an extraordinary genius. He authored the book Gram Hama'alot). He made great efforts to prepare Matzot. He sowed the wheat himself in his garden, and he then cut it, ground it with his own hands, and then prepared the dough and he the baked the Matzot. He took care of the whole process, with the utmost perfection, in holiness and purity.

At that time, it was customary to keep Matzot (or all sorts of pastries) in a special bag hanging from a rope on the ceiling of the house, to prevent insects and other rodents from touching it. Rav Meshulam also stored his Matzot in such a bag. In another similar bag, his Rebbetzen had placed the rest of the Matzot: the Matzot consumed on the days of Chol Hamoed, simple Matzot that the Rav had not prepared himself.

A maid-a poor Jewish girl was working in the house of Rabbi Meshullam. She lived in the house of the Rav and helped the Rabbanite in all the management of the home. The day before Pesach, the Rabbanite was in his kitchen and wanted to prepare Kneedler soup. The Rabbanite asked the girl to bring him three single Matsot from the adjacent room, to grind them to make the Matza dumplings. The servant did so without paying any attention, took the precious Matzot from the Rav and handed them to the Rabbanite. The latter, who did not know the problem, crushed them and made Matza dumplings.

As evening approached, when the Rav had already gone to the synagogue, the Rebbetzen wanted to place the Rav's Matzot on the table, but as she entered the room, she screamed. Where was the Rav's Matzot? The maid, who understood immediately what had happened, fled the house and hid near the synagogue. The Rebbetzen, panicked, decided to put simple Matzot on the table, in the hope that her husband would not pay attention.

A poor Jewish girl- worked as a maid in Rabbi Mashulam's home. She lived in his home and helped the Rebbetzen in managing her home. The day before Pesach, the Rebbetzen was in the kitchen and wanted to prepare Matza dumplings for the soup. The Rebbetzin asked the girl to bring her three Matzot from the adjacent room, to grind them to make the Matza dumplings. The maid without paying any attention took the Rav's precious Matzot and handed them to the Rebbetzen. The latter, not realizing the error, crushed them and made Matza dumplings.

As evening approached, when the Rav had already gone to the synagogue, the Rebbetzen wanted to place the Rav's Matzot on the table, but as she entered the room, she was shocked. Where was the Rav's Matszot? The maid, who immediately understood what had happened, fled the house and hid near the synagogue. The Rebbetzen, panicked, decided to put the simple Matzot on the table, in the hope that her husband would not notice.

The Rav returned from the synagogue, took a seat at the table and began to recite: "Kadesh Urchatz". He then realized that the Matzot on the table were not the ones he had made. Astonished, he turned to his wife: "Where are the Matzot I prepared? ". The Rebbetzen told him what had happened, and the Rav's took on a worried expression, but he was not worried about the Matzot, he was concerned about something else. "Where is the maid?''

The Rav ordered his son to look for the maid immediately. The son left, and returned a few minutes later, followed by the young maid, ashamed. The Rav made her sit down and said to her, "My daughter, know that the Matzot does not matter to me, do not worry about what happened, and to show you that I am absolutely not angry and that I want you to rejoice with us during the Seder, I promise you that at the end of the festival, the Rebbetzen will buy you a new dress!".

What an extraordinary story! Rabbi Meshulam, who had gone to such lengths to prepare these Matzot, was not seeking his personal interest in the Mitzvot. He had behaved in this manner to fulfill the divine precepts to perfection. Now, at that time, the greatest embellishment of the Mitzvah was to make the girl happy. Such was the true will of Hashem, praised be He. May Hashem help us to imitate the conduct of this tzaddik.

The Torah-Box Team - © Torah-Box

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